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Today, the Chicago Teachers Union will file a 10-day strike notice – the legal action that is required before teachers may go on strike. The majority of CTU members granted Karen Lewis, president of the CTU, approval to file the notice.

The filing means that teachers may go on strike anytime after September 10 – the first day of the first full school week for most CPS students. The CTU is still playing coy about whether or not the rumors of the filing are true. Jesse Sharkey, vice president of the CTU, told ABC Local 7 news that he can neither confirm nor deny that the rumors of the strike filing are true.

The CTU is also attempting to make CPS CEO, Jean-Claude Brizard, and Mayor Rahm Emanuel sweat, dangling the possibility of a strike over their heads to gain leverage at the negotiation table. Sharkey explained that once the notification of a strike is filed, it remains valid for months – allowing teachers to strike at whim.

According to an August 29 report by ABC’s Jessica D’Onofrio, “Teachers say they are stuck on salary increases, job security, adequate staffing for the longer school day and pay hikes based on experience.” None of these issues affect or would benefit CPS students, though CTU members have constantly proclaimed that they are fighting for the best schools for the children.

D’Onofrio quotes George Armstrong elementary teacher, Aleyse Faibisoff, as saying, “The strike has already hurt kids — even when there’s not been a strike.” This begs the question, how much more hurt will be inflicted on the students by an actual strike? Those CTU teachers…always thinking of the kids.

6 Responses

  1. George Kocan

    Democrat intellectuals have a moral argument which purports to justify the existence of unions. I will call it the “Greed Paradigm”: Employees need to band together to bargain because employers hold a huge advantage over just one person. They can force employees to work for low wages and in poor working conditions. Business owners operate under a presumption of guilt. They run businesses for profit. Organizations which operate to make profits are intrinsically immoral. So, the government has an obligation, if not to suppress them outright, at least, to make their existence as difficult as possible. Employees can do no wrong. If they do something wrong, the fault lies with the businessmen, who have no other motivation than greed. By bargaining collectively the little strengths of many employees translate into serious bargaining power.
    By bargaining collectively, they also keep potential employees out of the labor pool to force wages up. What happens to the potential employees who must remain unemployed because of the unions’ closed shops is of no concern to the union leadership or to the Democrat Party. We have welfare for that.
    In contrast to the Greed Paradigm, we have the “Service Paradigm.” This explains why public schools and other public institutions exist. Government operates under the presumption of innocence, because it does not exist to make a profit.
    Professionals, trained, certified by the state, and dedicated to public service are the only kinds of persons who can do such an important job as educating future generations. The government, the unions, and the Democrat party constantly assure us of the moral superiority of public service. Public servants serve the public good, not their own greed and selfishness. The owners of the public schools do not enjoy a profit no matter how well they succeed a educating the children. The trustees of a board of education often do not make any money at all. They work strictly as volunteers.
    Therefore, the Greed Paradigm has no place in a public sector union. It does not fit in logically anywhere in the Service Paradigm. Unions can only exist in greedy, dishonest, profit-making institutions not in innocent governmental bodies.
    A strike, in which teachers withhold their services and do not permit other teachers to take their place, is not a strike against some fat cat business men. It is a strike against the public good. It is a strike against the parents who must pay for the public education and their representatives on the school boards, who make no profits from the institution.
    Furthermore, a public sector strike is a strike against other public sector unions. Teachers unions and police unions actually are striking against each other in a war, where only the most ruthless and best organized will win, not the ones with the most credible grievances. This explains the riots in France, Greece and Spain. As public sector unions grow in the U.S., the division and chaos will grow.
    The only policy which makes sense in the Service Paradigm is that public servants earn less and enjoy fewer benefits than employees in private sector. Earning less proves the utility and the moral superiority of public sector institutions. Such a policy is not unfair, because it is completely voluntary, since better employment in the private sector is always an option.

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  2. John K

    Fire them – I’m sick of this crap. Emanuel is short a full number of fingers, and the same applies to his sack.

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  3. George Kocan

    I do not think anyone will be fired. This is the political theater which the Democrats stage to justify raising taxes. I thought strikes by public employees was illegal in Illinois.

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    • John K

      My dad was a cop in the city of Chicago. I believe, at first glance, that cops and firefighters cannot strike. Transit authority and teachers are a separate matter.

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      • George Kocan

        Since the teachers’ union has decided to strike, I propose that parents hold a counter strike and keep their kids home–not during the strike when classes will not be held anyway but after the strike is over and the school board has caved in to the union’s demands. Recall, that the schools lose money for everyday that a student is absent.

      • John K

        Looks like we have a strike! Oh, by the way, Chicago teachers need an elected school board and Air conditioning, and gives them more money and less hours, and no performance review. What a hole!

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